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Author: Ankur Desai, Director Products

Robin.io Elastic Stack Blog: Part 3 Note: This blog is Part 3 in a three-part series. If you missed either of the first two blogs, you can view Part 1 here, and Part 2 here.  Many organizations have already made the move from bare metal or VMs to Kubernetes to modernize their Elastic Stack deployments....
Robin.io Elastic Stack Blog: Part 2 Note: This blog is Part 2 in a three-part series. If you missed the first blog, you can view it here. Kubernetes is revolutionizing how many enterprises have been managing their bare metal or VM-based Elastic Stacks. Containerizing an Elastic Stack and running it on Kubernetes promises automated deployment,...
Robin.io Elastic Stack Blog: Part 1  Note: This blog is Part 1 in a three-part series. If you missed the introduction to the series, you can view it here. As we mentioned in the kickoff to this blog series, an increasing number of enterprises are using the Elastic Stack for log analysis. It’s a very...
Here at Robin, we constantly speak with our customers about the challenges they face with deploying new applications. One topic that keeps coming up is Elastic Stack, otherwise known as ELK Stack (the “LK” representing the other components, Logstash and Kibana). Specifically, ELK is an end-to-end log analysis solution that allows users to take log...
Enterprises are rapidly moving to containers to develop and run their applications. Containers may themselves be simple technology, but as hundreds of applications are containerized into microservices across an enterprise, thousands of containers are being created and deployed.
In this tutorial, we will create a snapshot of the MySQL database that has been deployed on Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE). We will then restore the database state using the roll back to a point-in-time snapshot feature.
We will create a clone of the MySQL database that has been deployed on Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE). Then we will make changes to the clone and verify that the original database has remained unaffected by changes that were done to the clone.
This tutorial walks users through a step-by-step guide to install Robin Storage on GKE. In this tutorial, we will create a GKE cluster with persistent disks and then install Robin Storage through Google Cloud Marketplace.
In this tutorial, we will deploy a MariaDB database on Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE) using Helm and load data in the database. Before you start this tutorial, make sure you have installed Robin Storage on GKE.
Create a clone of the MariaDB database that has been deployed on Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE). Then make changes to the clone and verify that the original database has remained unaffected by changes that were done to the clone.