White Paper – Deploy, Manage, Consolidate NoSQL Apps with Robin Hyperconverged Kubernetes Platform

White Paper - Deploy, Manage, Consolidate NoSQL Apps with Robin Hyperconverged Kubernetes Platform

NoSQL White Paper

NoSQL database applications like Cassandra, MongoDB, CouchDB, ScyllaDB, and others are popular tools used in a modern application stack. However, deploying NoSQL databases typically starts with weeks of careful infrastructure planning to ensure good performance, ability to scale to meet anticipated growth and continued fault tolerance and high availability of the service. Post-deployment, the rigidity of the infrastructure also poses operational challenges in adjusting resources to meet changing needs, patching, upgrades, backup and the ability to snapshot and clone the database to create test and dev copies.

Robin hyper-converged Kubernetes platform takes an innovative new approach where application lifecycle workflows are natively embedded into a tightly converged storage, network, and Kubernetes stack; enabling 1-click self-service experience for both deployment and lifecycle management of Big data, Database and AI/ML applications. Enterprises using Robin will gain simpler and faster roll-out of critical IT and LoB initiatives, such as containerization, cloud-migration, cost-consolidation, and developer productivity.

This complimentary NoSQL white paper shows how to bring 1-click simplicity to deploy, snapshot, clone, patch, upgrade, backup, restore, and control QoS of any Kubernetes-based NoSQL App :

  • Deploy, manage, and consolidate any NoSQL App in your environment
  • Self-service deployment of NoSQL Apps with 1-click
  • Infrastructure consolidation and cost savings

Infographic: Building Stateful Cloud Applications With Containers

Infographic: Building Stateful Cloud Applications With Containers

Tips From Top Thinkers

Building Stateful Cloud Applications With Containers

The continued expansion of the cloud, growing end-user application performance demands, and an explosion in database needs are all stacking up fast against enterprise IT teams. When it comes to building enterprise database and big data applications, many are finding that container technology solves for at least a few of these problems. Here are stats and tips from top thinkers on how to best use containers when building stateful cloud applications.

Persistent Storage is a Top Challenge

26% of IT professionals cited “persistent storage” as a top challenge, when it comes to leveraging containers.

Streamline Until It Hurts “Some of the best writers have said they refine their work by cutting till it hurts. Containers are the same way.” Eric Vanderburg Vice President, Cybersecurity | TCDI

Isolate Containers & Hosts “Maintaining isolation between the container and hosts system by separating the file systems is vital towards management of the stateful application.” Craig Brown, PhD Senior Big Data Architect & Data Science Consultant

Select an Intelligent Orchestrator “An intelligent orchestrator along with a softwaredefined storage with software-defined networking is very essential for running a cloud-based application.” Deba Chatterjee Senior Engineering Program Manager | Apple

A Majority of Enterprises are Investing in Containers

69% of IT pros reported their companies are investing in containers 69

Validate All States “What they all (containerized stateful apps) have in common is the requirement to reliably validate all possible states and state transitions when changes are made to the application.” Marc Hornbeek Principal Consultant – Dev Ops | Trace3

Ensure You Can Monitor All Containers “Containerised applications are addictive. They can be created, tested and deployed very quickly when compared to traditional VMs. The infrastructure to begin monitoring a potentially vast and varying number of new containers is essential.” Stephen Thair Co-Founder | DevOpsGuys

Ofset Workloads with Containers “Stateful applications often reside in 1 or 2 geographical locations and take heavy loads … and at diferent times during peak and of-peak periods. Understanding these variables will enable an operations team to determine how to best design the use of container applications.” Steve Brown Director, DevOps Solutions N.A. | Lenovo

Top Container Orchestrators Now More Popular Than DevOps Tools

When choosing a platform, 35% felt Docker was the best fit for them among all DevOps tools

Get Infrastructure Pros Excited “A lot of people focus too much on the fact that “those application guys” are coming to mess with our infrastructure, instead of thinking that maybe we can elevate our own jobs and start working more closely with applications.” Stephen Foskett Proprietor | Foskett Services

Follow Design Microservices Principles “One of the fundamental aspects of containers is moving to immutable application infrastructure, which means that you cannot store state and application in the same container.” JP Morgenthal CTO Application Ser

Don’t Use Containers for Data Storage “When dealing with stateful applications, precautions need to be taken to ensure that you are not compromising or losing data.” Sylvain Kalache Co-Founder | Holberton School

Looking for more advice on building your stateful cloud application with containers? Download our full eBook today for more exclusive advice from top cloud, DevOps, and container technology pioneers.

451 Research – Containers: economically better option than HW virtualization

451 Research - Containers: economically better option than HW virtualization

451 Research – Containers

451 Research – Containers: economically, they appear to be a better option than hardware virtualization

Is the hype around containers justified, or are they simply an alternative form of virtual machine? 451 Research believes containers are better placed, at least theoretically, to achieve lower TCO than traditional hardware virtualization. In fact, we have found that double-digit resource savings are achievable even with relatively simple implementations.

By reducing duplication, server resources are freed to be allocated to other requirements. In other words, container technology is likely to more efficiently ‘sweated’ – resources being shared, with the asset used to the fullest – than hardware virtualized counterparts. The asset-sweating stretches beyond just servers – band- width, time, bits, bytes and labor are all likely to be better utilized with containers, according to our research.

THE 45 1 TAKE
Rarely are decisions in IT based purely on cost. Cost is, of course, a factor, but this is balanced against the value achieved for that cost. Virtual machines are unlikely to be as cost-efficient as containers, but they do provide value in other ways (which we’ll cover in a follow-up report). However, the economic advantage of containers suggests they’re not slowing down anytime soon – by their very nature, they have an economic edge over hardware virtualization, and this is likely to be taken advantage of by vendors, providers and end users. Over time, software vendors will seek to improve containers, so their value proposition will only in- crease against virtual machines.

VIRTUALIZATION ECONOMICS

The primary economic benefit of traditional server virtualization is the ‘sweating of assets’ through the consolidation of hardware – it roughly means ‘getting as much use as possible out of what you already possess.’ Originally, one server meant one operating system, typically delivering one workload. Through virtualization, one server can hold multiple op- erating systems, each one operating a logically separated workload. Before virtualization, perhaps just a tiny fraction of the asset (the server and its resources) might be used at any one time. Through virtualization, we can multiplex multiple applications together, so that resources are shared and the asset is fully used.

451 Research – Containers: economically better

If a server at a total cost S was previously able to hold just one workload, but can now support n workloads, the cost per workload plummets from S to S/n. If n is 16, a fairly reasonable level of consolidation, that’s a 93% average cost savings per workload. The greater the value of n, the greater the savings. It is clear why virtualization is so commonplace today.

The cloud was the next step up from virtualization, providing the benefits of consolidation with the flexibility of being able to dynamically create and move resources to suit different business requirements. None of this is rocket science, and most in IT have theoretical and practical experience in the subject. But containers have seriously rocked the boat. They’re the new kids on the block, but are they all they’re cracked up to be?

A CONSOLIDATED NEW WORLD

451 Research – Containers are better cost wise over virtual machines

Hardware virtualization means that operating systems (and their applications) share hardware resources such as compute, storage and memory from a single asset, be it a server or even a pool of servers. Container technology, specifically system containers, is essentially operating system virtualization – workloads share operating system resources such as libraries and code.

Containers have the same consolidation benefits as any virtualization technology, but with one major benefit – there is less need to reproduce operating system code. Hardware virtualization means each workload must have all its underly- ing operating system technology. If the operating system takes up 10% of a workload’s footprint, then in a hardware virtualized platform, 10% of the whole asset is spent on operating system code. This is regardless of the number of work- loads, n, being run on the asset.

In the same environment utilizing containers, the operating system only takes up 10% divided by the number of work- loads, n. In a nutshell, our server is running 10 workloads, but only one operating system, in our container environment

– in the virtualized environment, the server would be running 10 workloads and 10 operating systems.

451 Research – Containers: economically, they appear to be a better option than hardware virtualization

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ESG Lab Review – Robin Hyper-Converged Kubernetes Platform

ESG Lab Review - Robin Hyper-Converged Kubernetes Platform

Abstract

This ESG Lab Report highlights the recent testing of container-based Robin Hyper-Converged Kubernetes Platform . Using a combination of guided demos and audited performance results, ESG Lab validated the ease of use, performance, scalability, and efficiency of Robin Systems’ container-based architecture. The Challenges Containers optimize application deployment by bundling all of the application’s required components into a single package, including supporting libraries and configuration files. Containers only require a supported Linux kernel to operate, making it easy to move them between environments, e.g., between hosts, from dev to test, or from test to production. Organizations are discovering that existing data center infrastructure is not capable of dealing with

This ESG Lab Report highlights the recent testing of container-based Robin Hyper-Converged Kubernetes Platform. Using a combination of guided demos and audited performance results, ESG Lab validated the ease of use, performance, scalability, and efficiency of Robin Systems’ container-based architecture. The Challenges Containers optimize application deployment by bundling all of the application’s required components into a single package, including supporting libraries and configuration files. Containers only require a supported Linux kernel to operate, making it easy to move them between environments, e.g., between hosts, from dev to test, or from test to production. Organizations are discovering that existing data center infrastructure is not capable of dealing with a large number of containerized applications since a single modern microservices-based web application can easily span hundreds or more containers. Organizations run many applications and often find their systems administration teams overwhelmed attempting to match resources with containers. Containers improve server utilization by allowing multiple applications to run on the same server. But since all applications share the same storage, storage performance can be erratic, which impacts overall application performance. To combat this, some organizations deploy critical applications on siloed infrastructure to ensure good performance, which leads to overprovisioned hardware and poor resource utilization.

Plans for Deploying Container Management Framework Technology Source: Enterprise Strategy Group, 2017 As shown in Figure 1, recent ESG research indicates that 68% of organizations are testing or using containers today, and another 16% are planning to start using them soon.1 The benefits of containers—including easy, consistent application deployment and light overhead when compared with virtual machines and hypervisors—make them appealing for a variety of applications.

Read more – ESG Lab Report

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